“Eating dogs” – A Talk by John Keeble at the Informal Northern Thai Group’, ‘There are three main Thai elements to eating dogs: a) the export trade; b) the commercial domestic market; and c) home killing. Although the export trade has grabbed the headlines and TV coverage, the domestic trade probably kills more dogs.\r\n\r\nPeople involved in the Thai export trade say Thai dogs taste better than Vietnamese dogs. In Hanoi, they say the past glut of Thai dogs meant a cheap source of food but they preferred Vietnamese dogs if they could afford them.’, ‘185_th_222.jpg’, ‘
There are three main Thai elements to eating dogs: a) the export trade; b) the commercial domestic market; and c) home killing. Although the export trade has grabbed the headlines and TV coverage, the domestic trade probably kills more dogs.

People involved in the Thai export trade say Thai dogs taste better than Vietnamese dogs. In Hanoi, they say the past glut of Thai dogs meant a cheap source of food but they preferred Vietnamese dogs if they could afford them.

There is no law in Thailand at the moment that makes it illegal to eat dogs, although they are not listed as food animals. An array of laws effectively make it illegal to commercially transport, keep and kill dogs but there is no specific law to combat the dog meat trade.

Current laws do not say it is wrong to beat your dog to death and eat it. I spoke to people who have either witnessed this or taken part in it. The dogs were eaten as special meals or a meal shared among friends who liked to drink beer with it.

Most people in Thailand – 95% according to an international NGO’s survey – oppose the killing and eating of dogs. However, the hidden minority is large enough to account for an enormous toll in dogs.

The dog meat trade is all about money, of course. It has grown into an industry that includes far more people that you would normally associate with it.

The system was working in the same way that the rubber and recycling industries work. The source material, in this case dogs, came from the grass roots; small collectors start the gathering; the collected dogs were passed to people further up the chain to build the numbers for smuggling or butchering.

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